***Monday, April 15, 2013, Commissioners met in regular session with Chairman Dan R. Dinning, Commissioner LeAlan L. Pinkerton, Commissioner Walt Kirby, and Deputy Clerk Michelle Rohrwasser. 

 

9:00 a.m., Road and Bridge Superintendent Jeff Gutshall joined the meeting to inform Commissioners that he wasn’t able to stay to give his department report due to a training course he and his employees are attending. Mr. Gutshall briefly discussed the process of seeking bids for vehicles.

 

Mr. Gutshall left the meeting.

 

Commissioner Pinkerton moved to declare the following county vehicles surplus and to authorize the sale of these items at public auction to be held on Monday, May 20, 2013 at 1:30 p.m.: 1999 Ford Expedition 4WD, Vin#1FMRU1867XLB92337, 1989 Ford F250 ¾ ton 4X4 pickup truck, Vin#1FTEF26H5KLA83665, and 1987 Chevrolet ¾ ton 20DLX 4X4 pickup truck, Vin#1GCEV24K4HJ136765. Commissioner Kirby second. Motion passed unanimously.

 

9:35 a.m., The Courthouse Maintenance Department report was cancelled.

 

Commissioners tended to administrative duties.

 

9:55 a.m., Boundary Volunteer Ambulance President Ken Baker joined the meeting.

 

10:00 a.m., Commissioner Kirby moved to recess as the Boundary County Board of Commissioners and convene as the Governing Board of the Boundary County Ambulance Service District. Commissioner Pinkerton second. Motion passed unanimously.

 

10:01 a.m., Commissioner Pinkerton moved to adjourn as the Governing Board of the Boundary County Ambulance Service District and reconvene as the Boundary County Board of Commissioners. Commissioner Kirby second. Motion passed unanimously. 

 

Mr. Baker left the meeting at 10:02 a.m.

 

Deputy Clerk Nancy Ryals briefly joined the meeting.

 

Commissioner Pinkerton moved to set monthly reimbursement payments for indigent account #2012-15 to a minimum of $50 per month when working in addition to 50% of annual state and federal tax refunds. Commissioner Kirby second. Motion passed unanimously. 

 

Deputy Clerk Ryals left the meeting.

 

10:25 a.m., Courthouse Maintenance Jerry Kothe joined the meeting to give his department report. Those present discussed quotes to trim Courthouse trees. Mr. Kothe proposed trimming three trees at a time followed by trimming the remaining four trees the next year.

 

Commissioner Pinkerton moved to have three of the seven trees near the Courthouse trimmed this year and trim four trees the following year. Commissioner Kirby second. Motion passed unanimously.

 

Chairman Dinning said the person who will trim the trees needs to have insurance.

 

10:26 a.m., Boundary Economic Development Specialist David Sims joined the meeting.

 

Mr. Kothe left the meeting at 10:30 a.m.

 

Mr. Sims discussed Riverside Park with Commissioners. Mr. Sims said if you were to look at Bonners Ferry, it’s on the Kootenai River, but in most ways the community doesn’t get the benefit of being on the water. Developing Riverside Park would be beneficial to citizens and travelers passing through. Mr. Sims mentioned the Parks and Recreation Board has even talked about doing some work. Mr. Sims said he would like to know what Commissioners’ plans are and how he can help. A consultant contacted the City of Bonners Ferry weeks ago and he was looking for a place to build a recreational vehicle (RV) park. This same contractor has also talked to Parks and Recreation Board member Rob Tompkins about an RV park and said that state funding may be available. Mr. Sims asked if Commissioners would consider that.

 

Chairman Dinning said the county wants to do what they can do encourage growth, but questioned if this would be in competition with other places. It may be possible to buy the five acre piece of property in that location with grant monies, according to Mr. Sims. Chairman Dinning asked if this grant is accessible to private parties also and Mr. Sims said he didn’t think so. Mr. Sims said this consultant has just completed a similar project in Genesee, but Mr. Sims said he feels he and Commissioners, etc., would have enough expertise to draft the grant proposal.

 

Commissioner Pinkerton said if the county moved to turn county-owned property into a park and someone wanted to put their own property adjacent into an RV park, that wouldn’t be an unfair advantage. It was said the sewage issue rears its head when talking about five acres and RV’s, but Mr. Sims said the state said that’s not a requirement since the fair grounds has a pumping station. Mr. Sims said one issue is if there was an RV park at Riverside Park, the County would want to have restrooms and a shower facility, but there may be a perk issue.

 

Mr. Sims said he talked to City of Bonners Ferry Administrator Stephen Boorman about water service and Mr. Boorman said he felt a water service could handle enough water for RV’s as long as the county didn’t use it to irrigate the grounds. Commissioner Kirby said he would think irrigation should be done just by putting a pump into the river since it is just right there.

 

Those present discussed industrial and commercial property in relation to new businesses coming to town. Commissioner Pinkerton mentioned putting together a portfolio on the community as it may be a draw for business owners.

 

Mr. Sims left the meeting at 11:00 a.m.

 

Airport Manager David Parker and Brad Niemeyer with JUB Engineering joined the meeting at 11:00 a.m. Bonners Ferry Herald Reporter Laura Roady and Blue Sky Broadcasting Reporter Mike Brown were also present.  

 

Mr. Parker showed those present a PowerPoint Presentation on the Boundary County Airport to include: airport boundaries, where problem trees are located, a history of the airport, accomplishments with associated costs and services offered.

 

Mr. Parker informed Commissioners the county will begin working with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Office located in Montana rather than the office in Seattle. Mr. Parker reviewed a list of FAA requirements. The PowerPoint listed 11 nearby airports and the lengths of their runways and Boundary County’s airport runway is the shortest. Mr. Parker reviewed the airport’s neighboring properties and added that he has been in touch with those property owners.

 

Mr. Parker reviewed costs associated with this project. The State of Idaho will provide 3.14% of project costs, the FAA will provide 90% and the County’s portion will be 6.86%. Mr. Parker said the County has enough funds to provide a grant match for a project totaling $1.2 million, but if there is project cost overrun, funding left over from other airports may be available. Costs have been reviewed and compared for engineering services and JUB’s cost of $179,000 for engineering services has been approved. Mr. Parker asked Commissioners for their signature on the recommendation package to help finalize the project.

 

Mr. Niemeyer explained the paperwork process in that the FAA is requesting the Purchase and Sales Agreement by July so they can get the grant documents in August. A meeting with JUB Engineering and the Airport Manager will follow sometime around August 5, 2013, according to Mr. Niemeyer.       

 

Mr. Parker left documents with Commissioners in order to be reviewed by the county’s prosecuting attorney prior to Commissioners signing.

 

Commissioner Pinkerton moved to continue the motions pertaining to the Boundary County Airport Grant paperwork until 1:45 p.m. today. Commissioner Kirby second. Motion passed unanimously.

 

 

The meeting with Mr. Parker and Mr. Niemeyer ended at11:35 a.m.

 

11:35 a.m., Hospital CEO/CFO Craig Johnson and Hospital Board of Trustees Chairman Elden Koon joined the meeting to give Commissioners an update on Hospital matters.

 

Mr. Johnson said Hospital financials are in the black for the first quarter including depreciation. The dietary elevator has had some problems, which resulted in an injury. Mr. Johnson said Idaho Counties Risk Management Program (ICRMP) Insurance agent Darrell Kerby was informed of the elevator breakdown and supposedly there is some coverage. Otis Elevators provided a quote of $43,000, but a quote from another company came in at $12,000. ICRMP may cover $8,000 to $9,000.

 

Mr. Johnson spoke of meeting with the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) for rural development about refurbishing the Hospital’s Building C. This is the brown building near the Hospital’s south side parking lot. This is a two physician practice that Kaniksu Health Services had used. There are rural development funds to loan to the Hospital, which would not encumber the building. Mr. Johnson said he made application for that, but then he found out it has to be the County to make application so he will gather information for Commissioners and request Commissioners make application. The total project cost is $110,000 to be paid by the Hospital. This process is similar to the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) Grant in which Boundary County requests funds to go to the Hospital.

 

11:50 a.m., Commissioner Kirby moved to go into Executive Session under Idaho Code #67-2345(1)b, to consider the evaluation, dismissal or disciplining of, or to hear complaints or charges brought against, a public officer, employee, staff member or individual agent, or public school student. Commissioner Pinkerton second. Commissioners voted as follows: Chairman Dinning “aye”, Commissioner Pinkerton “aye” and Commissioner Kirby “aye”. Motion passed unanimously. 12:00 p.m., Commissioner Kirby moved to go out of executive session. Commissioner Pinkerton second. Motion passed unanimously. 

 

The meeting ended at noon and Commissioners recessed for lunch.

 

1:30 p.m., Commissioners reconvened for the afternoon session with Chairman Dinning, Commissioner Pinkerton, Commissioner Kirby, and Deputy Clerk Michelle Rohrwasser.

 

1:30 p.m., Commissioner Pinkerton moved to go into executive session under Idaho Code #67-2345(1)b, to consider the evaluation, dismissal or disciplining of, or to hear complaints or charges brought against, a public officer, employee, staff member or individual agent, or public school student. Commissioner Kirby second. Commissioners voted as follows: Chairman Dinning “aye”, Commissioner Pinkerton “aye” and Commissioner Kirby “aye”. Motion passed unanimously. 2:00 p.m., Commissioner Kirby moved to go out of executive session. Commissioner Pinkerton second. Motion passed unanimously.

 

2:00 p.m., Chief Deputy Clerk Tracie Isaac joined the meeting.

 

2:00 p.m., Commissioner Kirby moved to sign the JUB Agreement for Professional Services, Land Acquisition and Relocation Services, A.I.P. #3-16-0004-Pending subject to the approval of the County’s attorney. Commissioner Pinkerton second. Motion passed unanimously.

 

Commissioner Kirby moved to authorize the Commissioners sign the letter to Mary Vargus with the Federal Aviation Administration regarding AIP 3-16-0004-012, Consultant Services Contract-Fee Negotiation land Acquisition and Relocation subject to the approval of the County’s attorney. Commissioner Pinkerton second. Motion passed unanimously.

 

Commissioners and Chief Deputy Clerk Tracie Isaac reviewed job position information for the Boundary County Sheriff’s Office.      

   

2:25 p.m., Commissioner Pinkerton moved to go into executive session under Idaho Code #67-2345(1)b, to consider the evaluation, dismissal or disciplining of, or to hear complaints or charges brought against, a public officer, employee, staff member or individual agent, or public school student. Commissioner Kirby second. Commissioners voted as follows: Chairman Dinning “aye”, Commissioner Pinkerton “aye” and Commissioner Kirby “aye”. Motion passed unanimously. 2:40 p.m., Commissioner Kirby moved to go out of executive session. Commissioner Pinkerton second. Motion passed unanimously.

 

Chief Deputy Clerk Isaac left the meeting.

 

Commissioners discussed the quote from Bonner County Juvenile Detention Center for housing Boundary County’s juveniles at $110 per juvenile per day. Chairman Dinning said Boundary County has had agreements with both Region 1 in Kootenai County and Bonner County in the past and he doesn’t know what it would hurt to sign another agreement with Bonner County again as it’s just something else to look at. Commissioner Pinkerton said Bonner County’s agreement is not an exclusive agreement so Commissioners can still honor the agreement with Kootenai County.

 

Commissioner Kirby said this is a piece of business that’s time has come. There is no loss and it’s a win win. Commissioner Kirby explained that juveniles may need to go one facility over another one depending on the severity of the issue.

 

Commissioner Kirby moved to enter into an agreement with the Bonner County Juvenile Detention Facility. Commissioner Pinkerton second. Motion passed unanimously.

 

Chairman Dinning said would like this new contract with Bonner County to automatically renew.

 

Commissioners tended to administrative duties.

3:00 p.m., Commissioners discussed the property behind the Courthouse and whether they wish to declare this property surplus.

Commissioner Kirby said since business owner Vic Rae has requested to purchase the property and since the County hasn’t been using this piece of property at all, the County could stand to profit from selling it. Commissioner Kirby suggested getting an approved appraisal to see what the value is and then determine if it should be sold. Commissioner Pinkerton asked how long this property has belonged to the County, if there had been a condemned building on it and why it was purchased in the first place. Commissioner Kirby and Chairman Dinning said the County had cleaned up the property in the past. The original appraisals on this property were done in year 2003 and the County purchased it in February 2004. The only thing done to this land is the County had it paved for parking. Commissioner Pinkerton said the fact of the matter is that it’s not being used for anything and he cannot see a need for it.

 

Chairman Dinning said this piece of property lends itself to economic development. Commissioner Kirby said this is the first approach on this piece of property and if a commercial neighbor wishes to expand, he doesn’t want to get in way of that.

 

Commissioner Pinkerton moved to declare County property described as Lots 3 through 7, Block 4, Riverside Addition, Section 27, Township 62 North, Range 1 East, Boise Meridian, surplus and to order an appraisal on it. Commissioner Kirby second. Motion passed unanimously.

 

Commissioners tended to administrative duties.

 

3:30 p.m., The Nature Conservancy members Robyn Miller and Kennon McClintock and landowners: Tony Shelton, Isabel Huff, Chuck Huff, Barb Lindgren and Mac Lefebvre joined the meeting to discuss placing their properties in the Forest Legacy Program.

 

Mr. Shelton briefly discussed the process and said this is a major commitment on the part of the landowners. It’s a long term matter, according to Mr. Shelton.

 

Ms. Miller said the funding source is the Forest Legacy Program and it is funneled through the Forest Service to the State of Idaho. The Idaho Department of Lands (IDL) ultimately is the agency to purchase easements from each landowner. It’s a very long process and this is the very early stage of that process. An application will be submitted for this competitive grant by May 31st. The Nature Conservancy and the property owners are here today to request a letter of support for this grant application. The grant will go from the state level to the regional level and finally the national level, according to Ms. Miller. The funding year is for federal fiscal year 2015 and the grant would close the end of years 2015 or 2016 so it’s a long term process. The goals of the conservation program are to maintain these properties and working lands such as active forestry, land management and farming. The program also provides for fish and wildlife habitat and can limit subdivision development. Each landowner will engage with IDL and TNC is needed as a land sponsor, but TNC’s role ends there. IDL negotiates, holds and monitors the easement. Ms. Miller said TNC is also applying for this grant as a landowner in this case.

 

Chairman Dinning asked if this is a proposal that is all or no one will receive it such as can one family be approved and one not. Ms. Miller said the property owners are applying as one proposal. Sometimes projects have been phased, but ultimately they are tied together as one project. The landowners currently present do wish to do this, according to Ms. Miller. Commissioner Pinkerton questioned how much land owned by Hancock is included in this proposal. Mr. Lefebvre said approximately $2,500.

 

Commissioner Pinkerton shared his thoughts on conservation easements. Commissioner Pinkerton said he grew up on property included in this proposal and this will encompass the road he used to use so he takes issue with that as he won’t be able to use it. Commissioners questioned if this is a perpetual application with non-motorized access. Commissioner Pinkerton said when landowners put a personal mandate on a property he feels it goes beyond the right and it doesn’t give the future generations any abilities.

 

Mr. Shelton said allowing access to properties in the Forest Legacy Program is sort of an individual case by case. Ms. Miller said by default a conservation easement doesn’t limit access. A conservation easement is just a tool to establish the vision and it is perpetual. In this project each property owner will make their own decision as to what’s best for them. Families have usually decided not to mention anything about restricting or allowing public access so it will be clear and the landowner can retain that right. In some cases negotiations for at least non-motorized access can be made in perpetuity. This doesn’t necessarily limit motorized access, but the landowner can make those choices as they see fit going forward. That access will continue to be the landowner’s choice. Ms. Miller said the hope is to keep access open.

 

It was said that in reference to the Hancock Timber Resource properties the Forest Service owns those roads and since Hancock owns the lower section of property, those roads always stay open. Commissioner Pinkerton said you usually hear the Forest Service saying they don’t have funds to maintain roads so they close the gates. It was said the Forest Service is the one agency funding this conservation easement to some extent. Commissioner Pinkerton said he’s not against the conservation. Commissioner Pinkerton spoke of the Forest Service funds used to fund this project in that the timber company is going to get a certain amount of money to put into conservation, but will still raise money for timber. That will happen if this conservation goes in there or not. Commissioner Pinkerton said it’s good for the Forest Service, but for the community who may possibly own it in the future, there are limits. The Hancock property has been moved from one timber company to another, but who’s to say it may not go to a private party.

 

Mr. Lefebvre said as recreational values increase, timber values decrease. Timber companies are diverging lots, etc. There is nothing saying the companies are going to raise timber on it forever either, according to Mr. Lefebvre.   

 

Mr. McClintock said lands going into the Forest Legacy Program are remaining large pieces and access is staying open, although access may not be motorized. The big picture is that large pieces of land are not getting split up. Commissioner Pinkerton said he doesn’t disagree that there are benefits. Commissioner Pinkerton said our society has placed a value on that, but in 50 to 100 years from now what is society going to value and will it be the same as today. By putting this land in the conservation easement it takes away abilities in the future. Commissioner Pinkerton said that is just his personal feeling. Commissioner Pinkerton said he would never take from his kids the right of what to do with the land.

 

Chairman Dinning said he appreciates discussing this with Commissioner Pinkerton understanding they may not be on same side of the fence. Chairman Dinning said this right also extends the ability to do what the landowner wants and the consequences are that they are responsible for today. Chairman Dinning said he knows matters have been brought up over the years that have been addressed especially in timber lands that there will be perpetual motorized access. Chairman Dinning said we may never know if a new road is needed somewhere to access a federal sale, and if verbiage about needing a road to better the community, depending on the language, is not included, that may need to be addressed. Chairman Dinning said the main roads may need to stay open to public and he questioned if that seems like a problem. Ms. Miller said she would have to look into that more as even though it is industrial land it is still a private landowner. Ms. Miller said she would pass on that concern to IDL and Hancock ultimately makes the determination as to what goes into the easement as that is not TNC’s role.

 

Chairman Dinning said to clarify, his concern is that the main roads not be closed by a Forest Service rule and the easement doesn’t restrict Hancock to create another easement. Chairman Dinning said he doesn’t want the document to say Hancock can’t.

 

Mr. McClintock said he thinks the McArthur Lake conservation easement project was similar to this. The fundamental purpose is to maintain the lands as working lands; the ability to put roads in to maintain timber.

 

It was said that Plum Creek is selling off huge pieces of ground in Montana.

 

Mr. Shelton said Commissioner Pinkerton does have some good points and it was said funding was Forest Service money, but he didn’t think it was. Ms. Miller said funding comes from the Department of Agriculture through the Forest Service to the State of Idaho. Ms. Miller said if the money doesn’t come here, it will be spent on the same type of project elsewhere so it can’t be used for any other designation.

 

Mr. Huff said he doesn’t have kids who will come back to his property. Mr. Huff said his sister is working on a deal to create a hiking trail easement from his barn to the Forest Service land so that land won’t be locked out, but they don’t want to open this property to a lot of homes. Mr. Huff said he realizes a person never really owns the land, but this will really slow things down some.

 

Ms. Huff said she truly enjoys going out her back door and having her space there, but she also has neighbors who are spoiling that space by letting their dogs run and throwing their garbage out there. One main goal of TNC is to stop development and it’s important to try to preserve areas of space.

Ms. Lindgren said her space is against Forest Service land on two sides, and she spoke of watching wildlife that also needs space just as people do. To be a steward of the land means to have space for people, but for animals as well.

 

Mr. Lefebvre said his family’s piece of land is on the west side and the family’s biggest reason for this conservation easement is their descendents and he didn’t see another any way to personalize and maintain character. Mr. Lefebvre said his family wants to be able to retain that character.

 

It was said TNC’s land is the old Heath property.

 

Chairman Dinning asked if the easement allows the existing homes to be rebuilt if a fire occurs. Ms. Miller said the easement even allows for a future homesites. Ms. Miller said TNC has not had discussions for what their property would look like, but they’ve always been fans of public access.

 

Commissioner Pinkerton said business-wise he fully understands the easement, but as far as perpetuity he draws the line. Chairman Dinning said there are philosophical issues and he and Commissioner Pinkerton have a difference. Commissioner Pinkerton said it’s good discussion.

 

Some concerns mentioned were access regarding Forest Service roads on company ground and addressing the ability to allow road easements.

 

Commissioner Kirby mentioned the business about building roads for anything and how someone can’t just necessarily say it’s for “timber.” Commissioner Kirby said he thinks back to living in Oceanside, California, as that is where he used to play as a kid and it’s now all condominiums.

 

Chairman Dinning said to him it’s not about limiting development as it is about personal property rights. Commissioners are looking at pieces on Hall Mountain that people have historically had access to. This is a cultural issue on those south lands so it would be preferred to have non-motorized public access. Ms. Miller said she has to realize that Hancock is a different landowner so she can’t speak on behalf of the company, but this is the best chance the public has for access. Ms. Miller said the titles of these lands are already split up. The McArthur Lake property had one owner initially, but now there are seven property owners although it is in management. The conservation easement tool is the best chance.

 

Commissioner Kirby moved to write a letter of a support for the conservation easement with conditions. Chairman Dinning yielded the chair to second. Commissioners voted as follows: Chairman Dinning “aye”, Commissioner Pinkerton “nay” and Commissioner Kirby “aye”. Motion passed.

 

Commissioner Pinkerton said there are people in this that he cares about and he is strong in his beliefs so it is not an easy decision.

Chairman Dinning said he appreciates the ability to discuss the differences and not take it personal. Both points are taken.

 

Chairman Dinning said any letter written will be reviewed by all Commissioners. This is hard and these matters may not necessarily be appropriate. There are thoughts on both sides about credence.   

   

The meeting to discuss a Forest Legacy conservation easement ended at 4:25 p.m.

 

There being no further business, the meeting recessed until tomorrow at 9:00 a.m.

 

***Tuesday, April 16, 2013, Commissioners met in regular session with Chairman Dan Dinning, Commissioner LeAlan Pinkerton, Commissioner Walt Kirby, and Deputy Clerk Michelle Rohrwasser.

 

9:00 a.m., Sheriff’s Office Chief Deputy Rich Stephens joined the meeting to discuss wages and certification incentives for Sheriff’s Office deputies. Chief Deputy Clerk Tracie Isaac, Sheriff Greg Sprungl, and Sheriff’s Office Administrative Assistant Jen Mayard also joined the meeting. 

 

Bonners Ferry Herald Laura Roady joined the meeting.

 

Chief Deputy Sheriff Rich Stephens said the Sheriff’s Office is looking to get some incentives established to help employee retention. In a nutshell there is no incentive to keep deputies from moving on to greener pastures and if the Sheriff’s Office could be a bit more competitive with neighboring counties, Boundary County would have a better chance of employing more qualified employees, according to Chief Deputy Sheriff Stephens. It’s not trying to be a comparison, but Boundary County’s Sheriff’s Office could at least be more competitive with incentives by looking at counties of similar size. Chief Deputy Sheriff Stephens said his idea was to offer a pay increase if deputies obtained more advanced certifications resulting in the county having more deputies with increased training. Chief Deputy Sheriff Stephens said it’s apples and oranges, but Boundary County loses deputies to Bonner County due to the other county’s perks. Chief Deputy Sheriff Stephens listed what the starting wage is for deputies in Bonner County and added that other counties offer shift differentials.

 

Chairman Dinning said he asked Chief Deputy Clerk Tracie Isaac to contact Benewah and Shoshone Counties. Chief Deputy Isaac said Benewah County’s rate of pay is between $.50 and $1 more than Boundary County and there are steps to reach for those increases. Shoshone County is a bit less compared to Boundary County. Chairman Dinning said there are other levels of sergeant or corporal and are those attainable with certifications. Chief Deputy Sheriff Stephens said if a patrol deputy receives a higher certification, it doesn’t mean they will be bumped to corporal. A sheriff’s office doesn’t necessarily have a need for more corporal positions with no one to supervise so it’s not an automatic position increase. It doesn’t make a lot of sense for the Sheriff’s Office to make all deputies corporals, according to Chief Deputy Sheriff Stephens.

In comparison to the City of Bonners Ferry if an employee receives an intermediate or advanced certificate, there is a 5% pay increase. Chairman Dinning said what the City of Bonners Ferry’s Mayor is hearing from his side is that the county staff is getting paid more, but then the county hears that the City of Bonners Ferry pays more. Sheriff Sprungl said the county does have better benefits, especially for families. This is looking at dollars.

 

Sheriff Sprungl said it’s hard to put a number on the employees who have moved on for employment in other counties. Chairman Dinning said that discussion has been had before when the county trains a deputy and then the deputy moves on, but if the County could do something along the lines of what has been proposed, he doesn’t know how much that would slow down.

 

Chairman Dinning asked if Sheriff Sprungl knew how many employees have moved on in the last few years. Sheriff Sprungl said he doesn’t have that figure off the top of his head, but it happens more when the sheriff position turns over. Chief Deputy Sheriff Stephens said he’s not diminishing what other departments are doing, but the deputies are out there putting their lives on the line.

 

Commissioners reviewed various county positions and their grade levels. Chairman Dinning said he really understands the dilemma and questions how to accomplish this for everyone. Sheriff Sprungl referred to making sure the bailiff’s position had been secured and how that position was bumped up in grade level and now he has to train a new dispatcher. The bailiff position is not that difficult of a job and it has normal hours of 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 a.m., according to Sheriff Sprungl.

 

Commissioner Pinkerton said there is a grading system for the county so this is not about finding a good applicant. The county needs to do something to increase pay for law enforcement to retain them, but the county system doesn’t currently have the wiggle room to upgrade, according to Commissioner Pinkerton. There are things law enforcement has to do that most county employees don’t and all re-certifications are a requirement of the job. Commissioner Pinkerton said the county has a good system, but there is no wiggle room. The sheriff’s position is a professional position and that office is trying to keep professional people in those positions. The more training the more competitive it’s going to get and it’s an ongoing thing. To keep people from moving on the county has kept pretty good benefits, according to Commissioner Pinkerton. It’s that grade or pay disparity. Commissioner Pinkerton said he supports finding a way to increase wages for the Sheriff’s Office, but at this point he doesn’t know how to do it.

Chairman Dinning mentioned the employees at the Restorium who dispense medications with no way to advance.

 

Sheriff Sprungl said the current system is a hybrid system from a wages study and in the middle of that was the classification committee. The original design was to have a commissioner on that committee. Sheriff Sprungl said the way the most recent bailiff position was written up was lacking.

 

It was said back in year 1996 wages were fairly arbitrary. Sheriff Sprungl said when the dispatch position was created it was part-time, no benefits and minimum wage, and employees were leaving to ball trees at Clifty View and the grading system was to help that. Sheriff Sprungl said he has to work with employees working on holidays and around the clock. Chief Deputy Clerk Tracie Isaac said the job description for detention deputy wasn’t brought before the classification committee until 1999. Chairman Dinning questioned how to make the system better.

 

Sheriff Sprungl mentioned not being able to say this is apples and oranges and he discussed his time on the Peace Officers Standards Training (POST) Council and making physical requirements more difficult. Sheriff Sprungl explained that employees can live in one county while working for a sheriff’s office in another county such as Spokane hiring Kootenai County employees and that trickles to Boundary County. It’s hard to just go out in this county to find people to do this job, according to Sheriff Sprungl. Commissioner Kirby said it seems to him from past experience that only a certain amount of people want to be policeman and those come to ask for the job. Sheriff Sprungl said he can’t go to the labor pool and just find someone. Commissioner Kirby said Commissioners are being made aware of a very serious problem and pretty soon will have to make a step for law enforcement. Commissioner Kirby said there needs to be a lot more thinking and research about this.

 

Sheriff Sprungl spoke of a deputy’s video taken of the deputy dealing with an in-custody by himself and what had occurred. Deputies are outside by themselves out there and this deputy had to struggle with a much larger individual, according to Sheriff Sprungl.

 

Commissioner Pinkerton said he knows exactly what Sheriff Sprungl is talking about in these conflict situations. Commissioner Pinkerton said the bailiff position is a different situation and it’s a position not run by the Sheriff’s Office. Sheriff Sprungl said nowhere else does the sheriff fill in for the bailiff’s position when the bailiff is on vacation. Commissioner Pinkerton said the issue is not that; it’s the disparity of his positions and we need to fix it as it’s broken.

 

Chairman Dinning said in moving forward to fix something in this specific area, the County has other dynamics in the system that Commissioners need to fix so there’s not a perception opposite of what the Sheriff’s Office is dealing with so not to cater to one department. The county needs to treat everyone equal and at this point he doesn’t have an idea of how to go forward. Chairman Dinning said the county needs to somehow reevaluate this whole system for all employees and bring it back in line.

 

Chief Deputy Sheriff Stephens said this is our county and other counties have probably gone through this same thing so what have other counties done to overcome this. Chairman Dinning said he can speak on what he hears and he knows that Boundary County is very unique as elected officials have a good relationship. There is an intentional effort for departments to come in to meet. Chief Deputy Sheriff Stephens said he appreciates that and to consider other departments is perfectly fair, but he’s working in his own bubble. Chairman Dinning said he would like to talk to the other elected officials with Sheriff Sprungl present and to say here’s our system and there are concerns. Chairman Dinning said there are peripherals to fix and he said Restorium employees starting out at approximately $8.68 per hour and there is constant turnover. Chairman Dinning said we need to determine to move forward and how to do it.

 

Commissioner Pinkerton said he looks at the critical factors worksheet and someone did a good first try, but there is always room for improvement. The template is done, but it just needs to be adjusted. Sheriff Sprungl thanked Commissioners and he said this is the furthest his office has gotten in these discussions.

 

Chairman Dinning said Commissioner received the 2014 E911 grant application packet from Eddie Goldsmith with the State of Idaho Emergency Communications Commission and wasn’t sure if the Sheriff’s Office had also received it. Chief Deputy Sheriff Stephens said Administrative Deputy Crystal Denton is currently looking at equipment needs so he knows she is working on it.

 

The meeting with Sheriff Sprungl, Chief Deputy Stephens, Ms. Maynard, and Chief Deputy Clerk Isaac ended at 9:50 a.m.

 

9:50 a.m., Commissioner Pinkerton moved to go into executive session under Idaho Code #67-2345(1)b, to consider the evaluation, dismissal or disciplining of, or to hear complaints or charges brought against, a public officer, employee, staff member or individual agent, or public school student. Commissioner Kirby second. Commissioners voted as follows: Chairman Dinning “aye”, Commissioner Pinkerton “aye” and Commissioner Kirby “aye”. Motion passed unanimously. 10:05 a.m., Commissioner Kirby moved to go out of executive session. Commissioner Pinkerton second. Motion passed unanimously.

 

Boundary County Emergency Services Incident Commander Bob Graham and Incident Director Dave Kramer joined the meeting at 10:05 a.m., to discuss use of the County’s Emergency Services vehicle. 

 

Mr. Graham said he’s heard concerns about him taking his county vehicle out of town. Mr. Graham said he does take that vehicle out of town for meetings, but they are official meetings; not personal. Commissioner Pinkerton said he doesn’t see a problem with that type of use as long as it’s for official county business. Mr. Graham said he just wanted to be sure he is okay to use the vehicle for county business out of town. Mr. Graham said he uses it for county and state business, and he leaves the vehicle at the airport for the state business and he hasn’t felt bad about that as the vehicle was paid for by the state.

Mr. Graham and Commissioner Pinkerton discussed the high school active shooter table top exercise held last week.

 

Chairman Dinning questioned the need for Mr. Graham’s vehicle if he is out of town on state business. Mr. Kramer said his own vehicle also has radio equipment in it. Mr. Kramer said under Emergency Management Mr. Graham didn’t feel he had authorization for out of town non-county business. It was said that Mr. Graham sits on the Idaho Department of Water Resources Board. Mr. Graham said he used to use his personal vehicle without compensation and if he used his own vehicle for the State Water Board meetings, the State would reimburse him, but he hasn’t requested it.

 

Commissioner Kirby said he doesn’t have a problem with the way Mr. Graham has been handling his transportation and Commissioner Pinkerton said he also doesn’t have an issue. Commissioner Pinkerton asked Mr. Graham how many water meetings there are and Mr. Graham said there are six per year. Commissioner Pinkerton said there is still some benefit to the county and Mr. Graham said it’s still official business; it’s not personal.

 

Commissioner Pinkerton said he wonders if it would be better to leave the county vehicle in town if Mr. Graham was to be out of town for a significant amount of time. Mr. Graham said he has his own personal equipment in the vehicle, which he has also never requested reimbursement for and if there is an emergency, he heads straight from the airport to the scene. Commissioner Pinkerton mentioned there is no need to run code to a scene. Mr. Kramer said he and Mr. Graham needed this blessing from Commissioners for this use and to make sure there is no issue with insurance coverage. Commissioners said there is a benefit to the county for Mr. Graham being a member of the Idaho Department of Water Resources.

 

The meeting with Mr. Graham and Mr. Kramer ended at 10:25 a.m. 

 

Alan Flory, Rob Tenas, and Kyle Flory joined the meeting at 10:25 a.m. to discuss making a documentary on Boundary County.

 

Commissioners said they would like to have a documentary that will tell the story about the forestry and logging work being done in Boundary County and how it’s done. There is funding available and Commissioners have ideas from their perspective to contribute. Mr. Tenas said most of his childhood was spent here and Commissioner Pinkerton said that is what it is about as there is understanding due to having lived in this area that people from Dallas, Philadelphia, etc., won’t understand. The Flory’s would be storytellers and could tell Boundary County’s story. Commissioner Pinkerton said it’s a great start and there are more things such as cultural matters to include and he referred to the Kootenai Tribe. Commissioners said what Alan Flory has done is what needs to be included in the documentary such as to keep industry in a forward motion, providing wildlife habitat, and providing jobs. Commissioners said these things are being taken away from the community and not just by the closing of the National Forest. Commissioner Pinkerton said he would like it pointed out that management of the forest is what is important, but not all management is good. Chairman Dinning said the other issue is that no management is also a form of management and there are related consequences. Commissioners said the sphere of influence is the Kootenai drainage and to look at everything from the standpoint of if you’re at Myrtle Creek, you could be affecting the water system, everything below that and various wildlife habitats and that is a story to tell. It’s not just forest. When the forest is treated properly there are other benefits and that’s the word that is not getting out. It was said besides the Flory operation it would be nice to see the next step. Commissioner Pinkerton said it would be good to show the forestry cycle from start to finish because that is how we have been living.

 

Chairman Dinning said there are so many things Commissioners want to touch on that hasn’t been conveyed and he asked Mr. Flory and Mr. Tenas how to proceed since they are the artists.

 

Mr. Flory said they would like to take the basic structure of Commissioners’ idea and run with it. Mr. Tenas said they would talk to the people who are contributing to the process. Mr. Flory and Mr. Tenas said if they hadn’t legitimately learned what they had from Alan Flory, they wouldn’t have been able to make their video. Alan Flory said Mr. Tenas ran with idea, but he and Kyle Flory had talked to a lot of people in the community. Alan Flory urged Mr. Tenas to think about their first conversation and Mr. Tenas said the overall idea was organic and much simpler and it just grew.

 

Chairman Dinning referred to the Wildlife Auto Collision (WAC) Committee, management of the National Forest, the Twenty Mile project, and the habitat restoration project and said it’s about how they all interact, but the biggest piece is the forest. Commissioner Pinkerton said all these different groups provide a piece.

 

Chairman Dinning said at one point will be the discussion of funding and the artists will have to determine what it will take. Commissioners need to determine this now, according to Commissioner Pinkerton.

 

Mr. Flory questioned the funding process. Chairman Dinning said there always needs to be a structure for accountability, and Mr. Flory asked if the county would be the hub. Commissioner Dinning explained that someone will always come along and want to know what they are funding. Commissioner Pinkerton said the group needs to be in a business scenario and to show how the funds are being accounted for and the developer’s time and equipment needs to be considered in determining funds. Chairman Dinning said with county money there is no legal way to transfer taxpayer money, but contributions for a specific matter can be accepted and that falls under the Clerk’s purview of how to handle that. Chairman Dinning said an employment agreement should be drafted. Mr. Tenas and Mr. Flory said their business is called Kyle and Rob Productions, but they were waiting for this meeting with Commissioners before putting together a business plan.

 

Alan Flory said he contributed a tax write off as it’s a documentary. Chairman Dinning said he feels a donation to a government is not tax deductible, but they could donate to a 501©3 who can donate to the county such as the museum. Alan Flory said there are so many people he has talked to over this last year who want to contribute to this project. After Mr. Flory’s and Mr. Tenas’ documentary received an award in Moscow there were 50 to 60 people who gave a standing ovation.

 

Chairman Dinning said moving forward he would like to fast track this. Alan Flory said between himself and Kyle Flory they could put together an employment agreement. Chairman Dinning said the county needs some mechanism for donations to the museum who can donate to the County. Alan Flory said there is a member of the community who wants to contribute and to continue to contribute and make this project what Commissioners would like it to be.

 

Chairman Dinning said there is nowhere that a tribe and two cities cooperate such as in Boundary County. Chairman Dinning said to him everywhere else other agencies are still fighting internally within their community and he feels this project will be good for other areas. Mr. Flory said it’s hard to know what’s special about this county without having grown up here or moving back here. Chairman Dinning said Commissioners can’t say in words what their vision is, but can in the documentary.    

 

Alan Flory said Kyle Flory and Rob Tenas met last year about the documentary and had spoken over the telephone and they provided him with accountability. Chairman Dinning said Commissioners will need to look at the length of time of the finished product such as 30 hour, 45 minuets, etc., so it will give some thought to how this plays out when people to see it. Mr. Flory said he was envisioning one hour on television, which equates to approximately 46 minutes. Mr. Tenas said the biggest part for he and Mr. Flory will just be incorporating what Commissioners want.

 

Alan Flory said he came today because he felt he could introduce this project to Commissioners and now he can step back and just contribute to the story. Chairman Dinning said he doesn’t want to limit Mr. Flory and Mr. Tenas, but Commissioners would like to be able to get some status updates throughout the process.

 

Alan Flory explained how Mr. Tenas and Mr. Flory said that they needed a crane and had built their own crane. A shot of that ingenuity would be good, according to Mr. Flory.

 

Chairman Dinning mentioned how the Kootenai Tribe would be a tremendous resource. Commissioner Pinkerton said this is exciting because we know we’re just temporary stewards and this will pass to the next generation.

 

The meeting with Alan Flory, Rob Tenas and Kyle Flory ended at 11:27 a.m.

 

Commissioner Pinkerton moved to adopt Resolution 2013-21. A resolution increasing the Restorium Fund budget due to receipt of unanticipated grant revenue for the Restorium Elevator Project. Commissioner Kirby second. Motion passed unanimously. Resolution 2013-21 reads as follows:

 

Resolution 2013 –21

INCREASING THE RESTORIUM FUND BUDGET DUE TO RECEIPT OF

UNANTICIPATED GRANT REVENUE FOR THE RESTORIUM ELEVATOR PROJECT

 

                WHEREAS, the Board of County Commissioners, County of Boundary, State of Idaho, did establish an operating budget for the Boundary County Restorium for fiscal year 2012-2013; and

 

                WHEREAS, $96,742.28 was received from the State of Idaho for the Restorium Elevator Community Development Block Grant Project; and

                WHEREAS, the Boundary County Restorium Fund is in need of additional revenue for fiscal year 2012-2013; and

 

                WHEREAS, the addition of this revenue does not affect the tax levy for Boundary County; and

 

                WHEREAS, it is appropriate to increase the Boundary County Restorium Budget Revenue Account Number 36-00-324-0010 and the Restorium Budget Expense Account Number 36-00-558-00, Reserve, in the amount of $96,742.28.

 

NOW THEREFORE, upon motion duly made, seconded and unanimously carried,

 

                IT IS RESOLVED, that the increase to the Boundary County Restorium Budget Revenue Account Number 36-00-0346-0010 and the Restorium Budget Expense Account Number 36-00-558-00, Reserve, in the amount of $96,742.28 is hereby authorized and ordered, and

 

                IT IS FURTHER RESOLVED that the Clerk is instructed to deliver certified copies of this resolution to the Boundary County Treasurer and the Boundary County Auditor.

 

                                                                                COUNTY OF BOUNDARY

                                                                                BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS

                                                                                s/__________________________                      

                                                                                Dan R. Dinning, Chairman

                                                                                s/__________________________                             

                                                                                LeAlan L. Pinkerton, Commissioner

                                                                                s/__________________________                            

                                                                                Walt Kirby, Commissioner

ATTEST:

s/_____________________________                                        

Glenda Poston, Clerk

By: Michelle Rohrwasser, Deputy Clerk

Recorded as instrument #257125

 

Commissioner Pinkerton moved to approve the minutes of March 18 & 19, 2013. Commissioner Kirby second. Motion passed unanimously.

 

There being no further business, the meeting adjourned at noon.  

 

                                                                        __________________________________

                                                                        DAN R. DINNING, Chairman

ATTEST:

 

_______________________________

GLENDA POSTON, Clerk

By: Michelle Rohrwasser, Deputy Clerk